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Hill Walking Terrain & Permits

A Hillwalking permit is required for all Hillwalking activities that take place in Terrain 1 or Terrain 2.

Terrains

Terrain 0 – No Permits are required for Terrain Zero. Terrain Zero is defined as

a. Meets all the following criteria:

• is below 500 metres above sea level; and
• is within 30 minutes travelling time from a road which can take an ordinary road-going ambulance or a building which is occupied (such as a farm) or another means of summoning help (such as a telephone box); and
• contains no element of mountainous steep ground (routes or areas where the average person would need to regularly use their hands at least for balance if not for actual progress. This does not stop people from using their hands as an aid to confidence.)

or:

b. Is a road, or path adjacent to a road, on which you would expect to see traffic

Terrain 1 – Terrain 1 is defined as

a: Meets any of the following criteria:

• is below 800 metres but more than 500 metres above sea level or;
• is more than 30 minutes but less than three hours travelling time from a road which can take an ordinary road-going ambulance or a building which is occupied (such as a farm) or another means of calling help (such as a telephone box).
and
• contains no element of mountainous steep ground (routes or areas where the average person would need to regularly use their hands at least for balance if not for actual progress. This does not stop people from using their hands as an aid to confidence.)

and
b.    Is not a road, or path adjacent to a road, on which you would expect to see traffic.
and
c. Is not Terrain Two as defined by Rule 9.30.

Terrain 2 –Terrain 2 is defined as

Terrain Two describes terrain which meets all of the following criteria:

a.    Meets any of the following criteria:

• is over 800 metres above sea level or;
• lies more than three hours travelling time from a road which can take an ordinary road-going ambulance or a building which is occupied (such as a farm) or another means of calling help (such as a telephone box), or:
• contains an element of mountainous steep ground (routes or areas where the average person would need to regularly use their hands at least for balance if not for actual progress. This excludes climbing activities but may include areas where ropes are used for confidence and security.)

and
b. Is not a road, or path adjacent to a road, on which you would expect to see traffic.

Those holding Terrain 2 Permits can run Hillwalking activities in Terrain 1 to the same permit level and type(Summer or Winter, Leadership or Supervisory).

Specialist Terrain – A Hillwalking or Climbing Permit is required but approval is needed from your DC. This terrain mainly covers those who wish to run Scrambling or Via Ferrata as part of an outing.

When in terrain or using skills that have not been assessed for a terrain 2 hillwalking or a climbing permit (such as glaciers, scrambling, via ferrata), then specific approval is required for the activity from the responsible Commissioner based on advice from someone with knowledge and experience of the activity. Specific approval is in addition to the holding of a terrain 2 hillwalking or climbing permit.

Permits

Levels of Permit

There are four levels of permit available for Hillwalking. These are:

  • Terrain 1 Summer conditions
  • Terrain 1 Winter conditions
  • Terrain 2 Summer conditions
  • Terrain 2 Winter conditions

Types of Permits

Personal – Only available to those under 18. This allows you to go hillwalking with other Scouts/Explorers who hold a Personal Permit as part of a scouting activity. You are unable to go hillwalking with those without a permit.

Leadership – Available to anyone of any age this permit allows you to lead a group in your particular activity. For Hillwalking you would be able to lead a group in a specified terrain, staying with the group at all times.

Supervisor – This permit will allow you to supervise young people/leaders who do not hold a permit in leading an activity. For Hillwalking you would be able to supervise up to three groups who are all walking different routes in the same area. Each group would need to be lead by a competent leader.

Additionally, each of these permits can be further restricted (such as through geographical locations etc) to end up with an individual permit to the level of the competence and requirements of the individual.

Hillwalking Assessors Summer Terrain 1 and 2

Roger Devey
Paul Westwood
Graham Clarke
Alex Harper

Assesment Checklist Walking